FREELANCE WRITER providing quality service since 1995 - ANGIE MANGINO  journalist / book reviewer






The Global Mind and the Rise of Civilization
By Carl Johan Calleman Ph.D.
2014
Reviewed by Angie Mangino
Rating: 3 stars
 
This is the fourth book the author has “...written in the English language where the Mayan calendar provides the basic understanding of the fundamental structuring of evolutionary time.... primarily as a description of the evolution of consciousness.”
 
The author writes in his preface that the first three books are background to “facilitate the understanding of the present book,” but are not necessary to understand this book.
 
Chapter one presents the direction this first volume in The Paradigm Shift Trilogy will take.
 
“It is the purpose of this book to bring clarity to what the mind is and while doing so, bring an understanding of what caused the rise of civilization on our planet.”
 
While this reviewer found many interesting hypotheses in this book, without a background in the Mayan calendar, ancient civilizations, or his previous works, the clarity proposed in the purpose was not easy to discern.  His new theory of our origins makes the reader rethink many commonly held theories, which is to its credit.
 
This is a book not to be read quickly.  The best comparison that comes to mind is the diligence required to comprehend a college level textbook for a new course taken.  Without benefit of an instructor or class discussions to give direction, this is especially heavy material to read. 
 
As previously stated, without previous background knowledge, this reviewer believes to fully appreciate this book requires extensive research to grasp that knowledge on one’s own.  While some new ways of looking at the mind and the beginning of our civilization does show through, the language used to share them did not attain the full clarity proposed as the author’s purpose.
 
This book presents a philosophical theory based on extensive historical information of the ancients of our civilization and the Mayan calendar.  There is substantial presentation of research and theory, backed by extensive reference notes. 
 

This is not a book for every reader, but for one fascinated by its premise, it offers food for thought.